Neuroethics

Neuroethics

Neuroethics explores the ethical, legal and social impact of neuroscience; for example, brain imaging techniques that could make it possible to tell when someone is lying or make assumptions about sanity or guilt in criminals with different brain characteristics. Neuroethics will be a critical part of neuroscience as technology advances, so read about it in our journal today!

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Anosognosia: Is Vestibular Stimulation Ethical?

Anosognosia: Is Vestibular Stimulation Ethical?


Introduction Anosognosia, a severe symptom associated with mental illness,  is the inability of a patient to perceive his or her own neurological disorder. Caused by the deterioration of the frontal lobe by illnesses such as dementia and bipolar disorder, anosognosia is highly detrimental to society’s well-being and upkeep since anoso...

Revisiting Brain Death: Restoring Consciousness with Cutting-Edge Research

Revisiting Brain Death: Restoring Consciousness with Cutting-Edge Research


Abstract May 2018—Trenton McKinley: ‘Brain-Dead’ Boy Wakes Up Hours Before Organ Donation (The Week) September 2017—Jahi McMath, Girl Declared Brain Dead Three Years Ago, Might Still be Technically Alive, Judge Says (LA Times) July 2017—Brain Dead Mother Gives Birth to Twins After Being Kept on Life Support fo...

Armstrong? More like Brainstrong: Cognition Enhancing Drugs in Academia

Armstrong? More like Brainstrong: Cognition Enhancing Drugs in Academia


Abstract As far back as written history can recall, drugs have been used to alter the human body. From increasing muscle size to numbing pain, stimulating the senses to shutting down parts (or all) of the body, medicinal and recreational drugs have been tailored by manufacturers to meet the ever-growing needs and desires of society. In recent de...

Who Do We Believe?: The Neuroethics Surrounding the #MeToo Movement

Who Do We Believe?: The Neuroethics Surrounding the #MeToo Movement


Abstract The number of refugees throughout the world, particularly children, has skyrocketed in the last decade. The trauma they face, both in the home and host country, causes changes in the hippocampus, reward centers, grey matter, and amygdala. The neurology behind these symptoms is complex and not fully understood yet. These changes are link...

BCIs – Increasing the Wealth Gap

BCIs – Increasing the Wealth Gap


Introduction The term brain-computer interface is often associated with thoughts of a science-fiction world filled with cyborgs and aliens, but, as far off in the future as it may seem, many companies and universities today are working to make that vision a reality today. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are machines that convert neural impulses...

Ethical Implications for Electrostimulation and Optogenetics

Ethical Implications for Electrostimulation and Optogenetics


Abstract Electrostimulation and optogenetics are examples of new technologies that researchers have developed to tackle neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s diseases. However, critics have voiced concerns highlighting the dangers of these technologies being used in clinical applications. This article resolves ...

Treating Unconscious Patients When End-of-Life Preferences Are Not Declared

Treating Unconscious Patients When End-of-Life Preferences Are Not Declared


Introduction It is only fair that all patients have their end-of-life preferences met. However, this idea becomes complex when the patient has not expressed end-of-life preferences prior to an injury and is in a state where communication is not possible. Patients in a comatose, vegetative, or minimally conscious state are often in such situation...

The Problem with Propranolol: The Ethical Implications of Memory Dampening Technology

The Problem with Propranolol: The Ethical Implications of Memory Dampening Technology


Introduction Researchers are exploring a novel treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that has been shown to manipulate traumatic memories. Neuroethicists explore the possible ramifications of the new drug, as concerns about the quality of human life, the criminal justice system, and the military start to become increasingly relevan...

The Rising Conflict Between Neuroscience and Who We Are

The Rising Conflict Between Neuroscience and Who We Are


Introduction Neuroethics has become increasingly differential from the study of bioethics throughout the last few decades. This categorical separation of research can be accredited to the accelerated development in neuroscience and neurotechnology, which has consequently resulted in the emergence of ethical issues [1]. Currently, researchers of ...

Stuck in Modern Limbo: How can we help the (un)conscious patients?

Stuck in Modern Limbo: How can we help the (un)conscious patients?


Abstract Numerous disputes surrounding the case of Vincent Lambert have shown us that the treatment of unresponsive patients is still a highly controversial topic. Disorders of consciousness are also yet to be properly understood, which can potentially contribute to a wrong diagnosis – and for the people concerned that ...

Nico-teen: The Neuroethics of Adolescent Electronic Cigarette Use

Nico-teen: The Neuroethics of Adolescent Electronic Cigarette Use


Introduction The past few years have seen a rise in the use of electronic cigarettes among adolescents. The adolescent brain is especially vulnerable to the nicotine compounds in electronic cigarettes due to its unique chemistry and is not only more easily addicted to nicotine, but also significantly more harmed than post-adolescent brains. Cons...

Neuromarketing in Politics: The Ethics of a New Age

Neuromarketing in Politics: The Ethics of a New Age


Introduction We’ve all seen those brightly colored posters that deck the sidewalks during election season. A bolded name paints the small square, typically with a quick political slogan at the bottom, and perhaps a small photo of the candidate or party for some allure. Either way, we’ve all likely come across some form of political a...

Moving On: A Refugee Crisis

Moving On: A Refugee Crisis


Abstract The number of refugees throughout the world, particularly children, has skyrocketed in the last decade. The trauma they face, both in the home and host country, causes changes in the hippocampus, reward centers, grey matter, and amygdala. The neurology behind these symptoms is complex and not fully understood yet. These changes are link...

Brain-Computer Interfaces: Futuristic Prospects and Ethical Dilemmas

Brain-Computer Interfaces: Futuristic Prospects and Ethical Dilemmas


Abstract As technology continues to advance at an unprecedented rate in our society today, we now have access to a multitude of new possibilities. One of these prospects is the development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), technology that enables direct communication between a machine and signals from the brain, thus enabling us to control ou...